« Reason for Market Freefall in One Word | Main | Ode to a Friend: On Life, Death & Perspective »

August 18, 2011

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c3e6353ef014e8ab8ea4a970d

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Don't Try to Predict Your Own Behavior:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Leone

Kind of reminds me of those who waist their time and energy preparing for an event, usually for the worst.

Perhaps we should focus on we can react post an event as opposed to planning before, only to not have the character to act.

I always find your posts engaging Kent,
Many thanks,
Leonardo

Kent @ The Financial Philosopher

Leonardo:

Yes, as often as possible I am a "cross-the-bridge-when-I-get-there" person. So often people get anxious thinking about possible outcomes that may or may not occur. And if they do occur they are not as imagined.

This quote comes to mind here:

"My life has been full of terrible misfortunes most of which never happened." ~ Michelle de Montaigne

Andrew

Great post Kent I love how it ties in with the previous post.

It is the paradox of imagination it can be so powerful and useful but also hinder and hold us back, best summed up in these two quotes?

“Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” Einstein

“ The more you observe life in relation to yourself the more you will see the fact that you are hardly ever correct when you think about something in the future. The future exists only in imagination; and that is why, no matter how hard you try to imagine it, you will not be able to predict the future with total certainty. ”
Barry Long


Master And Student

Most investors and traders try to predict and err. Instead, if they could prepare themselves and react, they could possibly make it a day.

kalamazoo financial planner

I think the best thing to do in life is to just "roll with the punches." Live life day to day. This article was an interesting way to talk about investment risks.

The comments to this entry are closed.